Category Archives: Fiduciary updates

Presidential Memorandum Issued on the Department of Labor Fiduciary Rule

At Arnerich Massena, we are proud that we have always been ahead of the curve on this issue, acknowledging fiduciary status and offering independent, unbiased advice to retirement plans.

The Department of Labor’s fiduciary rule, finalized in April of 2016, was set to go into effect in April 2017, with some regulations effective January 1, 2018. But a Presidential Memorandum issued on February 3, 2017 may delay or even halt the regulation. The memorandum directs the Department of Labor to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the impact of the rule. If the “updated economic and legal analysis” determines that the rule is likely to harm investors or adversely affect Americans’ ability to gain access to financial advice, the DOL is instructed to publish for notice and comment a proposed rule rescinding or revising the fiduciary rule. The memorandum does not explicitly order a delay in the rule’s implementation, but it’s very possible that the review and analysis may require a delay. Read more »

Consultant Ryan Cunningham Discusses the Investment Line-up of the Future in a Video Interview with PlanSponsor Magazine

What are some of the key issues and trends retirement plan sponsors should consider when crafting the investment line-up of the future? If you haven’t had a chance to view it yet, take a few minutes to view this short video interview, in which Arnerich Massena consultant Ryan Cunningham, CAIA, discusses the answer to this question with Alison Cooke-Mintzer, editor of PlanSponsor Magazine. Read more »

Rollover Relief – Savers can Now Receive a Waiver to Extend the 60-day Deadline

Until now, retirement savers normally had just 60 days to roll over their 401(k) or IRA accounts before the account becomes taxable. Generally, this is plenty of time to effect a rollover, but occasionally hiccups happen – anything from a post office delay to a family illness – and the resulting tax burden, including a 10% penalty tax for account holders younger than 59 ½, can be devastating to a retirement nest egg. Read more »

Excessive Fee Lawsuits in Higher Education Retirement Plans

Just as we blogged about the growth of excessive fee lawsuits in retirement plans, the news reveals that Yale, MIT, and NYU are all now the subjects of lawsuits alleging that their defined contribution plans charged employees excessive fees. On Tuesday, August 9, all three universities were sued by participants for breach of fiduciary duty, claiming that the plans used higher-cost retail mutual funds rather than other, lower-cost share classes. Read more »